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Pausing content

What to do

Users should have enough time to read and use content.

Why it matters

People with disabilities may need more time to read or interact with content.

Examples

Better pausing content

A scrolling image feature at the top of a web page can be paused or restarted by pressing the spacebar.

Poor pausing content

A scrolling image feature at the top of a web page has no way for users to pause it.

Moving content

What to do

Users should be able to pause, stop, or hide moving, blinking, or scrolling information that starts automatically, lasts more than five seconds, and is presented along with other content.

Why it matters

Blinking content that lasts more than five seconds can be distracting to users with learning disabilities and users with low vision.

Examples

Better moving content

New blog posts on a web site are highlighted with an animated image that blinks the word "New" when the page is loaded. The image stops blinking within five seconds.

Poor moving content

New blog posts on a web site are highlighted with an animated image that blinks the word "New" when the page is loaded. The image never stops blinking.

Flashing content

What to do

Content should not flash more than three times in any one second period or be below general and red thresholds.

Why it matters

Flashing can cause seizures if the flashes are bright and large enough.

Examples

Better flashing content

A video of a thunderstorm that shows several flashes of lightning very fast and large is slowed down so there is a sufficient pause after each flash to avoid violating the general flash threshold.

Poor flashing content

A video of a thunderstorm shows several flashes of lightning so fast and large that the general flash threshold is violated.

 More information on timed content accessibility...


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